Tropical Savannas CRC > Networking > Savanna Futures Forum '08 > Session 2: Industry and community NRM

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Session 2 — Industry and community NRM

Chair: Paul Novelly

Is Heffernan right? What is the real potential for pastoral and agricultural development in North Australia? Neil MacDonald, Robyn Cowley and Steve Petty

With extended droughts in the south and projections for worse to come under climate change, the focus of Australian agriculture has clearly turned to the tropical north. The practical implications of this are already being seen, with a major increase in the value of farms and pastoral properties over the last few years and in the number of development applications submitted.

This paper sets out to look critically at the real potential for northern development, particularly in the pastoral area. This assessment will be based on the findings of the TS-CRC project “Developing Grazing Management Tools to Improve Savanna Condition”, which set out to extend our capability to objectively estimate safe carrying capacity, and also on the Pigeonhole Project which looked at alternative models of intensification.

Documents

What is the real potential for pastoral/agricultural development?
Summary of talk delivered by Neil MacDonald to Savanna Futures Forum, February 28th 2008, Darwin [pdf 12.4 kb]


What is the real potential for pastoral/agricultural development? Slideshow
Slideshow of a talk delivered by Neil MacDonald to the Savanna Futures Forum, February 28th 2008, Darwin [pdf 2.5 Mb]


Fire management: Jeremy Russell-Smith

Before considering future challenges facing fire management and associated applied research issues across the tropical savannas, it is useful to consider the achievements of the Tropical Savannas CRC and its partners over the past decade or so. These have been substantial. An early challenge was to develop a coordinated approach to fire management research across the north that was inclusive of and relevant to all major extensive landholders, the rural fire agencies and fire researchers.

Documents

Fire Management Summary
Summary of talk delivered by Jeremy Russell-Smith to Savanna Futures Forum, February 28th 2008, Darwin [pdf 16.2 kb]


Fire pdf Slideshow
Slideshow of talk delivered by Jeremy Russell-Smith to the Savanna Futures Forum, February 28th 2008, Darwin [pdf 3.1 Mb]


Monitoring and managing biodiversity John Woinarski, Alaric Fisher and Alex Kutt

There has been a substantial savanna biodiversity program, in various guises, for the lifetime of two iterations of the Tropical Savannas CRC.

The general objectives of this program have been to increase our basic knowledge of the distribution and conservation status of savanna biota; to investigate the impacts of a range of land management regimes on biodiversity; to better incorporate consideration of biodiversity conservation into land management planning and decision-making; to develop robust techniques for assessing and monitoring biodiversity ‘health’; and to provide information about biodiversity in useful forms to a wide array of land managers and other stakeholders.

Documents

Biodiversity Slideshow
Slideshow of talk delivered by Alaric Fisher to the Savanna Futures Forum, February 28th 2008, Darwin [pdf 5.4 Mb]


Biodiversity Summary
Summary of talk delivered by Alaric Fisher to Savanna Futures Forum, February 28th 2008, Darwin [pdf 22.9 kb]


Talking turkey about future conservation directions: how to cater for dispersive species in a dynamic landscape: Mark Ziembicki

Many birds of Australia’s arid and monsoonal regions are characterised by dispersive or nomadic movements and large population fluctuations in response to variable climatic conditions. These characteristics, compounded by our generally limited knowledge of bird movements and population dynamics, complicate population monitoring and conservation for such species. Indeed, the protection of dispersive fauna in general is regarded as one of the greatest challenges for conservation biology because conventional conservation practices and representative reservation cannot adequately cater for such species.

This presentation discusses these issues in light of a study that used the Australian Bustard as a ‘model’ for developing techniques to monitor and predict population fluctuations and dispersive movement patterns over broad spatial and temporal scales.

Documents

Bustards pdf Slideshow
Slideshow of talk delivered by Mark Ziembicki to the Savanna Futures Forum, February 28th 2008, Darwin [pdf 4.3 Mb]


Bustards Summary
Summary of talk delivered by Mark Ziembicki to Savanna Futures Forum, February 28th, Darwin [pdf 11.5 kb]


Contacts

Ms Robyn Cowley
Dept Primary Industries, Fisheries & Mining
Tel: 08 89739750

Fax: 08 89739777

PO Box 1346
KATHERINE, NT 0851


Dr Alaric Fisher
Senior Scientist
NT Dept Natural Resources, Environment, the Arts & Sport
Tel: 08 8995 5000

Fax: 08 8995 5099

PO Box 496
PALMERSTON, NT 0831


Dr Alex Kutt
CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems
Tel: 07 4753 8547

Fax: 07 4753 8600

Davies Laboratory, Private Mail Bag PO
TOWNSVILLE, QLD 4814


Mr Neil MacDonald
NT Dept Primary Industry, Fisheries & Mines
Tel: 08 8973 9746

Fax: 08 8973 9777

PO Box 1346
KATHERINE, NT 0851


Dr Jeremy Russell-Smith
Fire Management Consultant
Tel: 08 8922 0830

Fax: 08 8922 0833

PO Box 37346
WINNELLIE, NT


Dr John Woinarski
NT Dept Natural Resourcs, Environment, the Arts and Sport
Tel: 08 8995 5000

Fax: 08 8995 5099

PO Box 496
PALMERSTON, NT 0831


Mr Mark Ziembicki
PhD Student
Department of Natural Resources, Environment and The Arts
Tel: 08 8995 5000

Fax: 08 8995 5099

PO Box 496
PALMERSTON, NT 0831